Leonard Burton

He/Him/His

Leonard Burton is the President of the Center for the Study of Social Policy (CSSP). In this role, he brings more than three decades of leading anti-racist, intersectional social justice work including executive leadership in public social service systems, philanthropy, community change, faith-based programs, and youth development. Previously, Mr. Burton was a Senior Fellow at CSSP, working on the Systems Change and Public Policy teams and focusing on promoting healthy development and well-being for young people involved in intervening public systems. Mr. Burton is also a co-developer of the upEND Movement which focuses on abolishing family policing and reimagining and creating better means of care for children and families.

Mr. Burton serves on the Boards of Building Bridges Initiative, as well as leading research organization WestED. He is also a national advisor and consultant to the National Child Traumatic Stress Network at Northwestern University supporting youth engagement and anti-racist practices in the context of child welfare and juvenile justice. Mr. Burton served as faculty coach on the Breakthrough Series Collaboratives for Transition Age Youth and Father’s and Paternal Relatives in Child Welfare.

Mr. Burton attended Langston University, holds a Bachelors’ degree in Public Administration from Austin Peay State University, and a Masters’ Degree in Education-Administration and Supervision from Tennessee State University. He is a proud native of Detroit, Michigan, and currently resides in Huntsville, Alabama with his spouse Cheryl; they have two adult children and a teenage grandson. Mr. Burton is a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc., and a combat veteran of the US Army.

#CARES4Power

Follow us on Instagram to learn more about our work, the CARES Ambassadors, and the policies we are building to advance change for all transition age youth.

Happy Friday! We're back with our "Key Equity Term" Series; today's Key Equity Term is ✨Discrimination✨. This series aims to expand the reach and use of many terms that appear in our work, lives, and communities. 

Discrimination fact: According to the American Bar Association, "Racial discrimination in U.S. child welfare is a human rights issue. On August 30, 2022, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD), a group of international experts charged with monitoring state compliance with human rights obligations on racial discrimination, expressed concern at the 'disproportionate number of children of racial and ethnic minorities removed from their families and placed in foster care' in the U.S. Stay tuned for new terms in the coming weeks, and if you have additions — let us know!
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#Discrimination #classisinsession #KeyEquityTerms #CARES #CARESAmbassadors #KeyTerms #Wordoftheday #WOTD
Check out CARES #NewYork Ambassador Kayonda talking about what policy issue she feels has been neglected and should be an immediate concern. See what the CARES Policy Agenda is about by visiting CARES4Power.org or the LinkTree in our bio. This policy agenda reimagines how policy supports young people.
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 #CARES #fostercare #CARESNationalPolicyAgenda #EconomicSecurity #YoungAdults #nationalfostercareawarenessmonth #nationalfostercaremonth #Mayisfostercareawarenessmonth #MayFosterCareAwarenessMonth #FosterCareAwarenessMonth
Check out CARES #Atlanta Ambassador Aisha speaking about what she envisions for the future of the country. See what the CARES Policy Agenda is all about by visiting CARES4Power.org or the LinkTree in our bio. We, as a society, owe young adults the support they need to find their way and flourish. 
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#CARES #fostercare #CARESNationalPolicyAgenda #EconomicSecurity #YoungAdults
#Mayisfostercareawarenessmonth #MayFosterCareAwarenessMonth #FosterCareAwarenessMonth
#nationalfostercareawarenessmonth #nationalfostercaremonth
We know that children and youth do best when they are able to remain in their homes and communities. And when families do become known to the child welfare system, it is the system’s responsibility to partner with families in ways that promote autonomy and provide supports and resources that keep families together. ⁣
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For LGBTQ+ youth and their families, this requires having a system, including staff, that engage youth and families with dignity and are affirming and responsive to their needs, as well as partnerships with a broader network of community-based supports that can meet families’ needs.⁣
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Check out our full statement on how Systems, policies, and communities play an important role in affirming LGBTQ+ young people in the foster care system on our blog.  🔗 in bio.
Young people want to be seen for their whole selves and deserve to feel encouraged, affirmed, and supported as they make their way in the world. 
 
Join us TODAY from 2:30-3:45 PM ET for a panel discussion hosted by @chcidc to talk about opportunities to support and affirm #LGBTQ young people in foster care, featuring LA Ambassador @danie.rose_ 
 
Learn more and register at https://bit.ly/3VcAbA07m